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Home Fettling Suspension Rock Shox SID Rear Shock Air Can Service

Rock Shox SID Rear Shock Air Can Service

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For some reason people seem to be afraid of fettling shocks. There's no need to be. This is a quick and easy service that will prolong the life of your shock and keep it running smooth. The procedure for Fox air shocks is very similar and there is a good video demonstrating it on the Fox Racing Shox website.

tools needed

  • 5mm allen key
  • Shock pump
  • Rags
  • Degreaser
  • Judy butter or similar oil soluble grease
  • (maybe Rockshox air can wrench or similar)
1. Remove the shock from the bike. Remember the frame will pivot without the shock in place.Use rags to stop any contact and resulting scratches.

2. Clean the shock well - you don't want dirt getting inside it when you take it apart! Remove the reducer bushes from the eyelets. Remove the travel o-ring.

3. Record the positive and negative chamber pressures so you can set them again later. Let all the pressure out of both chambers. The button on the bottom of the shock pump allows this to be done easily and safely without having to poke things in the valves!

 

4. Unscrew the silver air can locking collar. This can usually be undone by hand but if over tight you may need to get the proper Rockshox air can wrench or improvise with a car oil filter remover or similar..

5. Pull the air can off the shock. Depress (or remove) the negative schrader valve while you pull to allow air in and make removal easier.

6. Clean everything thoroughly. Use some mild citrus degreaser if necessary. Inspect all the o-rings as you do so. Remove them if necessary to aid cleaning or replace them if damaged.

7. Grease the following:

  1. Fixed Piston Glide Ring
  2. Fixed Piston O-ring
  3. Can O-ring
  4. U-cup seal, glide ring and wiper

 

8. Replace the air can on the shock. Be careful not to damage the Fixed Piston O-ring and Glide ring as you do so. Put a little grease on the locking collar thread, line up the Schrader valves and tighten up the collar.

9. Pressurise both chambers and re-fit the shock to the bike.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 March 2010 13:25  

Comments  

 
# bme107 2010-04-01 15:39
I just bought a shock like this which was used and it does not hold negative air and the positive leaks out slowly over several days. Internet searching for service info has led me here.

Can you tell me, were the glide rings in your shock shown in the picture at #1 and #4 split? Mine are split and do not form closed circles.
 
 
# Mad Pierre 2010-04-02 18:52
Glide rings are split. This is usual to allow removal and insertion. The o-rings are the seals. You should replace them by the sound of it?
 
 
# mntbiker036 2010-04-16 10:51
Hey thanks for this, it's very helpful. I was wondering if you know of any place to get a rebuild kit for a rear rockshock sid? Thanks again for taking the time.
 
 
# mntbiker036 2010-04-16 10:53
[quote name="mntbiker036"][we don't stop riding cuz we get old we get old cuz we stop riding]
 
 
# Mad Pierre 2010-04-26 10:00
Glad to be of service. I'm not sure where to get a kit from? Probably worth trying www.tftunedshox.com/
 
 
# sil2222 2013-03-17 07:44
I have 2 of these shocks negative chamber holds air fine, but what i find is when you remove pump enough air comes out of neg side to make is appear as if its leaking my shocks will go from 100 psi to 50 psi just by removing pump from valve this will make it appear as if seal has failed and is leaking to really test attach pump overnight and note psi if psi is same next day no leak also try sitting on bike with pump attached i found filling neg side first then positive helped to keep a lot of air escaping when filling neg side and removing pump from valve.
 

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Disclaimer

The above guides do not necessarily contain techniques recommended by bicycle / component manufacturers. If in doubt contact the manufacturer or get a professional bike shop to carry out the work.

If you trash your beloved steed or invalidate your warranty don't blame me!